Vote No to a Referendum on Democratic Reform

Update: CBC's The Current interviewed some experts on the subject of referendums in the aftermath of the Brexit referendum. They cover all of the same territory. You can hear the episode here. There's a certain logic to the idea that the issue of electoral reform should be settled by a referendum. After all, if we're … Continue reading Vote No to a Referendum on Democratic Reform

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Talking About Climate Change in the Wake of Disaster

Canada is on fire. Fort McMurray is not the only place, but certainly the highest profile. The Manitoba-Ontario border is also burning, and there are hundreds of smaller fires across the country. My heart goes out to those who have been displaced by this; I can only imagine how difficult it must be, and I'm … Continue reading Talking About Climate Change in the Wake of Disaster

The Challenge of Participatory Democracy

Last Friday was the final lecture in our six-part lecture series, and everyone who came was brilliant. I'm going to post my lecture here, but I want to highlight a few things first. I wrote this lecture to try to convince people to vote, partly because the topic of Participatory Democracy is a big one … Continue reading The Challenge of Participatory Democracy

On Priorities

I've quickly discovered, running as a Green candidate, that the larger parties set the conversation topics around election time. So long as we're talking about what they're talking about, we're part of the national conversation and get a decent amount of press coverage; but if the larger parties get distracted by side issues and partisan … Continue reading On Priorities

TPP, Globalized Trade, and Resiliency

This morning the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) was signed. This is the biggest trade agreement in the world, covering 40% of global trade and including 12 nations, including Canada, the US, Mexico, Japan, Chile, Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia, Peru, Brunei, Singapore, and Vietnam. Previously, the biggest trade agreement that Canada was a part of was … Continue reading TPP, Globalized Trade, and Resiliency

Abortion, Refugees, and Making Room for Moral Action

My last post on marijuana and why legalizing it is not an endorsement of it has generated a lot of interest, and I've received a number of emails from people asking me about my stance on abortion in light of this discussion of the limits of law in relation to morality. I really appreciate that … Continue reading Abortion, Refugees, and Making Room for Moral Action

Morality, Marijuana, and Legislation

A comment I made recently on Facebook about marijuana prohibition brought some very negative feedback, so I thought I would elaborate on the subject a bit. I'll also reflect on the nature of morality in legislation and legislation in public life, because that's foundational to my view. I'll start this off by pointing out that … Continue reading Morality, Marijuana, and Legislation

True Diversity is Hard, but So Worthwhile

On Friday evening I hosted the second of our six lectures, this one titled "Embracing Diversity: Living an Enriched Life Within Canada's Borders" and presented by Wendy Peterson. Wendy described diversity by noting that there are hundreds of distinct First Nations in North America, but that we treat them all as a single entity under … Continue reading True Diversity is Hard, but So Worthwhile

On the Possibility of a Nonviolent Nation

Last night Karen Ridd opened up our lecture series with "Swimming Upstream: Being Nonviolent in a Violent World." Her presentation was by turns enchanting, engaging, challenging, and inspiring. One thing that came up several times, perhaps given that I was hosting the event, is how nonviolence relates to a national stance on ISIS and foreign … Continue reading On the Possibility of a Nonviolent Nation